Why osu basketball reduced ticket prices electricity deregulation map

OSU announced the reduction for at least 12 upper-bowl sections of Gallagher-Iba Arena, from $250 to $150, which is a really good price for what probably will be 15 or 16 home games. That’s about $10 a ticket. Not bad at all and a nice nod to fans, who for decades have come to expect price increases, not decreases.

But cost hasn’t always been the problem with stagnant or diminished attendance. Quality of the home team is the No. 1 factor in most teams’ attendance. But quality of the opponent matters, too, and college basketball for a long time now has paid no mind to the campus crowd.

I know I write about this every year, and maybe you get tired of reading it, but it remains a problem. College basketball has developed a system in which the fans who matter most, the fans who buy tickets game after game on campus arenas, are treated with little respect. Game times are placed on the whims of television. And non-conference schedules are spread abroad, literally in some cases.

OSU’s 2018-19 schedule is not set. But we know that the Cowboys will participate in an Orlando, Florida, tournament with defending NCAA champion Villanova, Florida State, LSU, Memphis, Charleston, Canisius and Alabama-Birmingham. Sounds like a good, solid field.

OSU announced the reduction for at least 12 upper-bowl sections of Gallagher-Iba Arena, from $250 to $150, which is a really good price for what probably will be 15 or 16 home games. That’s about $10 a ticket. Not bad at all and a nice nod to fans, who for decades have come to expect price increases, not decreases.

But cost hasn’t always been the problem with stagnant or diminished attendance. Quality of the home team is the No. 1 factor in most teams’ attendance. But quality of the opponent matters, too, and college basketball for a long time now has paid no mind to the campus crowd.

I know I write about this every year, and maybe you get tired of reading it, but it remains a problem. College basketball has developed a system in which the fans who matter most, the fans who buy tickets game after game on campus arenas, are treated with little respect. Game times are placed on the whims of television. And non-conference schedules are spread abroad, literally in some cases.

OSU’s 2018-19 schedule is not set. But we know that the Cowboys will participate in an Orlando, Florida, tournament with defending NCAA champion Villanova, Florida State, LSU, Memphis, Charleston, Canisius and Alabama-Birmingham. Sounds like a good, solid field.

OSU announced the reduction for at least 12 upper-bowl sections of Gallagher-Iba Arena, from $250 to $150, which is a really good price for what probably will be 15 or 16 home games. That’s about $10 a ticket. Not bad at all and a nice nod to fans, who for decades have come to expect price increases, not decreases.

But cost hasn’t always been the problem with stagnant or diminished attendance. Quality of the home team is the No. 1 factor in most teams’ attendance. But quality of the opponent matters, too, and college basketball for a long time now has paid no mind to the campus crowd.

I know I write about this every year, and maybe you get tired of reading it, but it remains a problem. College basketball has developed a system in which the fans who matter most, the fans who buy tickets game after game on campus arenas, are treated with little respect. Game times are placed on the whims of television. And non-conference schedules are spread abroad, literally in some cases.

OSU’s 2018-19 schedule is not set. But we know that the Cowboys will participate in an Orlando, Florida, tournament with defending NCAA champion Villanova, Florida State, LSU, Memphis, Charleston, Canisius and Alabama-Birmingham. Sounds like a good, solid field.

OSU announced the reduction for at least 12 upper-bowl sections of Gallagher-Iba Arena, from $250 to $150, which is a really good price for what probably will be 15 or 16 home games. That’s about $10 a ticket. Not bad at all and a nice nod to fans, who for decades have come to expect price increases, not decreases.

But cost hasn’t always been the problem with stagnant or diminished attendance. Quality of the home team is the No. 1 factor in most teams’ attendance. But quality of the opponent matters, too, and college basketball for a long time now has paid no mind to the campus crowd.

I know I write about this every year, and maybe you get tired of reading it, but it remains a problem. College basketball has developed a system in which the fans who matter most, the fans who buy tickets game after game on campus arenas, are treated with little respect. Game times are placed on the whims of television. And non-conference schedules are spread abroad, literally in some cases.

OSU’s 2018-19 schedule is not set. But we know that the Cowboys will participate in an Orlando, Florida, tournament with defending NCAA champion Villanova, Florida State, LSU, Memphis, Charleston, Canisius and Alabama-Birmingham. Sounds like a good, solid field.