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Next, there’s an application called "InSSIDer" http://www.metageek.net/products/inssider which you can use to see all nearby traffic in the 2.4Ghz band, and what channels it operate on. It’s useful for finding "not so crowded" channels. Leaving your router in "Auto channel scan" mode is often hurtful for performance as the algorithms used are not that great and leave a lot of stuff out of the equation.

Note though, that the best way is probably to select all the channels one by one and the check for highest and lowest reception % for a 10 minute period or so, through the "Status > Wireless" page in your router, and I mean the "Signal (%)". In my case channel 6 gives the best reception even though a nearby router also operates on it.

Last but definitely not least. If you have a D-link wireless adapter, the biggest mistake you can make is to use D-links drivers. The company that makes the hardware for it is called Ralink, and has much more resent, better, and more stable drivers available http://www.ralinktech.com/support.php?s=1

Quite untrue. When you add a higher gain antenna directly to the DIR-655 you do indeed increase the output level. Noise is noise, it’s not generated by the antenna. It will also help in the receive side of the WI-FI when receiving packets. Think of the old TV antennas, "rabbit ear" were OK if you right on top of the TV transmitter. The farther away from the transmitter the weaker the signal. People would put up "out door" antennas. The longer the boom (length) of the antenna the better it received the signals. The same also applies to all radio signals. It’s true the longer the coax is the more signal will be lost. The shorter the better. I replace the 2.5 db omnidirectional antennas that came with DIR-655 with 5 db omnidirectional antennas, talk about better coverage. Basically the formula goes with ever 3 db of gain on the antenna you double the strength of the signal. That works both ways.

Also there is no frequency difference between 802 b,g,n. The difference is the modulation the use, not the frequency. If you see one designed for N there is NO difference to a G antenna. There is a difference in 802a verse 802b,g,n. 802a operates on 5.6 Ghz verse 2.4 Ghz for 802b,g,n.

Quote from: rrance on January 21, 2010, 06:37:19 PM Quite untrue. When you add a higher gain antenna directly to the DIR-655 you do indeed increase the output level. Noise is noise, it’s not generated by the antenna. It will also help in the receive side of the WI-FI when receiving packets. Think of the old TV antennas, "rabbit ear" were OK if you right on top of the TV transmitter. The farther away from the transmitter the weaker the signal. People would put up "out door" antennas. The longer the boom (length) of the antenna the better it received the signals. The same also applies to all radio signals. It’s true the longer the coax is the more signal will be lost. The shorter the better. I replace the 2.5 db omnidirectional antennas that came with DIR-655 with 5 db omnidirectional antennas, talk about better coverage. Basically the formula goes with ever 3 db of gain on the antenna you double the strength of the signal. That works both ways.

Also there is no frequency difference between 802 b,g,n. The difference is the modulation the use, not the frequency. If you see one designed for N there is NO difference to a G antenna. There is a difference in 802a verse 802b,g,n. 802a operates on 5.6 Ghz verse 2.4 Ghz for 802b,g,n.