Wwii planes will not land in dayton due to weather conditions e 87 gasoline

A dozen World War II planes —- including three World War II-era bombers — will rumble the skies Wednesday above the Miami Valley to mark the unveiling of the restored icon the B-17F Memphis Belle, expected to bring thousands of spectators to the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force this week.

Two B-17s —the Movie Memphis Belle, which starred in a 1990 Hollywood film about the famed plane, and Yankee Lady of the Yankee Air Force — along with several P-51 Mustangs and training aircraft — will fly in from Grimes Field in Urbana while the Experimental Aircraft Association’s Aluminum Overcast will take-off from Dayton-Wright Brothers Airport in Miami Twp., on Wednesday morning, said museum spokesman Rob Bardua.

The Memphis Belle and a new World War II strategic bombing exhibit will be unveiled at a private event Wednesday evening with a public ribbon-cutting at 9:15 a.m. Thursday, the 75th anniversary of the Memphis Belle’s 25th bombing mission over Europe.

Under restoration at the museum since 2005, the Memphis Belle was the first U.S. Army Air Force’s bomber to finish 25 missions over Europe and return to the United States. The plane, the star of a 1944 documentary, embarked on a three-month war bonds and morale building tour in 1943 that included a stop in Dayton.

The Movie Memphis Belle and the Yankee Lady will sell rides for $450 a seat Friday and Saturday at Grimes Field and Aluminum Overcast will sell rides for $475 a seat to EAA non-members and $435 for members Saturday and Sunday at Dayton-Wright Brothers, organizers said. For additional information on rides aboard Aluminum Overcast, log onto b17.org; for Movie Memphis Belle log onto https://nationalwarplanemuseum.com/rides-1; and for the Yankee Lady log onto http://yankeeairmuseum.org/fly/.

A bipartisan group of congressional lawmakers have called on the U.S. EPA leader to release a chemical pollution study that reportedly shows lower threshold levels for groundwater contamination that could impact more than a hundred military bases, including Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, but the head of the agency said he doesn’t have the authority to release the study.

U.S. Rep. Mike Turner, R-Dayton, in his own letter this month, and a bipartisan group of lawmakers from California to Massachusetts in a separate letter, urged EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt to release the study after Politico, citing newly released emails, reported the White House and the EPA had sought to block the public release of the U.S. Health and Human Services report because “it would cause a public relations nightmare.”

But in a response to Turner’s letter and the other congressional leaders, Pruitt wrote this week the Health and Human Services agency had the right to release the research findings, but “the EPA does not have the authority to release this study.”

Chemical substances known as perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) have been found in the groundwater at Wright-Patterson and near a Dayton firefighting training site on McFadden Avenue. The material, commonly found in many household items, also was found in an old formula of firefighting foam sprayed at both sites.

“The release of this study is a public health and safety issue for every community with a military installation, including mine,” Turner, whose district includes Wright-Patterson, wrote to Azar. The EPA has set a lifetime health advisory exposure level of 70 parts per trillion.

U.S. Sen. Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio, said in a statement Wednesaday to this news outlet: “Keeping information from people about the health and safety of their water is disgraceful. The EPA and HHS must release this report immediately and work with the Air Force and the city of Dayton to ensure the water is safe.”

U.S. Sen. Rob Portman, R-Ohio, said in a statement Wednesday: “(It’s) important to ensure EPA’s health advisories are up to date and reflect the best available science and information. The EPA and HHS should release this report immediately to ensure that the men and women serving our country, as well as our communities supporting them, are drinking clean, safe water.”

In a May 18 letter, 13 House representatives on both sides of the political aisle from California, Colorado, Massachusetts, Michigan, New Hampshire, New York, Vermont, and Washington state, had asked Pruitt to release the report. The lawmakers noted studies have linked the substances to cancer, thyroid disease, increased cholesterol, and fertility issues, among health concerns.

“It’s a little hard for me that (Pruitt) won’t act to have the report released when he seems to have the authority to block the report,” he said Wednesday, referring to published reports. State policy makers especially could use the data to set contamination threshold levels, Kildee said.

City of Dayton officials have urged Wright-Patterson to take more aggressive action to prevent tainted groundwater migrating off base and potentially threatening groundwater pumping wells along the Mad River. Base authorities say they have installed monitoring wells to track where a contamination plume is headed and have pointed to the city’s firefighting training site as a possible source of contamination.